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In contrast this is why i call people racists

[The Frankie Boyle ‘racism’ case makes me question the language we use Bim Adewunmi](http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/oct/16/frankie-boyle-racism-case)

Adewunmi is totally right to take this approach.

But I find that I can’t help but generally disagree.

Yes, all the problems pointed out exist: call a white person racist and you’ll be met with all kinds of indignant outrage.

They’ll feel insulted and attacked. They might feel guilty and ashamed.

And, again, this is exactly why I prefer to call them racists (or white supremacists).

I’ve said it before: doing something bad means you are bad. It may not be all that you are. And life is complex that we can be both bad and good at the same time.

But. Asking me to care about the ways that you are good, when what you’ve done is demonstrate the ways that you are bad, is a bit ridiculous.

As I’ve said before: no one’s humanity is up for discussion. Not mine. I don’t call people racist to encourage a discussion. I don’t care about dialogue. Or having them understand why and how what they did was bad.

I want them to feel that sting of shame and embarassment and relate to what they just did

and never do it again

because. I refuse to engage in an interaction where i try to convince someone that i’m a human being.

refuse