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callouts and the glee of spectators

I peeked my eyes into tumblr for a moment and say that Riley had a post saying that, if you know them, you shouldn’t be surprised at what happens if you fuck up.

Yes. This is true. I’m not quite sure why anyone would think that they are exceptional or deserve some kind of magical immunity from accountability.

But. I actually want to address that notion of people ‘cheering’ them (or anyone else) on during a callout or whatever.

It is interesting when I got into with with natalie reed about callout culture that she was like “it is bad!1!!” and entirely missed my point that sometimes it is necessary. And that the good might be only to that single individual. And that is okay.

What Riley said, and I’ve seen this happen with other people (even myself) is that if you are in the position that you are calling someone out or just raging about some thing that happened to you, you get a certain selection of people who are just sitting there, watching, essentially eating popcorn

as your pain becomes their theatre

I find callouts extremely stressful. They usually trigger an anxiety attach for reasons related to my childhood abuse and how I learned to react to confrontation. I don’t actually like getting that angry and upset. It usually sours my day/evening. Makes me cranky. More likely to snap at my lovely bf. Often takes me hours or days for my nerves and anxiety to settle down again. For me to breathe easy. For my pulse to slow.

It gives me little pleasure. But sometimes it is necessary. It gives me even less pleasure to watch other people have to do this too.

So. Really. If callouts, doing or watching, is something you are doing for fun, you are probably an abusive asshole and I don’t like you.